Lanternflies, New “Unicorn” of the wild

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Lanternflies, New “Unicorn” of the wild

Photo Courtesy of MNN.com

Photo Courtesy of MNN.com

Photo Courtesy of MNN.com

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First a spider that makes webs 25 times stronger than steel to a termite who has a makeshift gun for a face, what’s next? Lanternflies, also known as the “unicorn of the wild.”

This small insect is also known as a potential threat to important crops such as grapes, peaches, and timber trees. These bugs are known to only roam Pennsylvania. If seen in a new location, it is encouraged to capture it and place it in a vile of alcohol to kill it and preserve it.

Lanternflies are causing so much damage, the U.S Department of Agriculture announced that 17.5 million will be spent to dispose of these small bugs.

The arboreal bug has a long protruding nose that operates as a straw. Also called “snouts”, the nose is completely hollow, according to mnn.com. The snout help the small creatures to get sap from inside of trees.

The larger side of the lanternflies can grow up to three inches long.

The Lanternflies got their name from the misapprehension that their long noses glow in the dark.

These multi-colorful small bugs don’t always come in such bright colors. Some are in colors that blend in with their surroundings.

 

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