Lyrid Meteor Shower Expected to Appear on Earth Day

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Photo Courtesy By mnn.com

A Lyrid Meteor Shower is expected to appear in the skies above the Northern Hemisphere on Earth Day, April 22  of 2018, according earthsky.org.

The April Lyrids is a meteor shower that happens each year between the days of April 16 and April 25.. The radiant or point of seeming origination  of the meteor shower is located is in the constellation Lyra, near the constellation’s brightest star Alpha Lyrae, according to earthsky.org.

The Lyrids “shooting stars” will appear to emit around the brilliant star Vega, in the shower’s namesake constellation Lyra, according to nationalgeographic.com. Vega also now shines nearly overhead for stargazers in the Northern Hemisphere. According to nationalgeographic.com, the best time to view the lyrid meteor shower is between moonset (from 1-2 am) and dawn.


This will be the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, and according to nationalgeographic.com, it us  almost as if  nature is putting on its own fireworks. Even though the Lyrids have been observed since 687 B.C, each year the shower’s events are unpredictable.

“Lyrid meteors are little pieces of Comet Thatcher, a long-period comet that orbits the sun about once every 415 years. Pieces of debris left in the comet’s wake, however, make an appearance every year. (Comet Thatcher’s most recent perihelion, or closest approach to the sun, was in 1861. It won’t be back until the year 2276.),” according to space.com.

In 1982, American observers saw an outburst of nearly 100 meteors per hour. There were 100 meteors seen going at an hour in Greece 1922 and Japan 1945, according to  earthsky.org.