The Four New Elements on the Periodic Table Get Names

Photo Courtesy of newyorktimes.com

Photo Courtesy of newyorktimes.com

Soon, there will be new names for the four new elements discovered on January 7, 2016, reported theguardian.com.

The new names for the elements are Nihonium (Nh), Moscovium (Mc), Tennessine (Ts), and Oganesson (Og). Previously, the elements were known for their atomic numbers 113, 115, 117 and 118, added cnn.com.

Mrs. Hanger an 8th grade science teacher said, “I’m very excited and want to know which scientists the elements got named after.”

Element number 113 was named Nihonium because of the country Japan. “Nihon” is one of two ways to say Japan in Japanese. “The element was discovered by a team at RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science and led by professor Kosuke Morita,” reported cnn.com.

“Moscovium, element 115 was located at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Moscow Russia.” stated rt.com. The ancient Russian land that is home of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, where the discovery experiments were conducted using the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator in combination with the heavy ion accelerator capabilities of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear reaction, stated IUPAC.

Element number 117 was named Tennessine because of the U.S state Tennessee. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California many teams discovered elements 115, 117 and 118, added nytimes.com.

Oganesson, element 118 discovered at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. Dubna (Russia) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, (USA) proposed the name Oganesson and symbol Og. The scientists named the element Oganesson to recognize Professor Yuri Oganessian for his pioneering contributions to transactinide elements research. He has many achievements include the discovery of supermovie and discovery in the nuclear physics of superheavy nuclei. Stated npr.com

Finally, laboratories from all around the world are working on the search for elements that would belong in the 8th row of the periodic table,reported iupac.com.