An Exploding Shock wave Star was Seen for the First Time

Photo+Courtesy+of+www.I4u.com

Photo Courtesy of www.I4u.com

The exploding shockwave star took place 1.2 billion light years away and lasted about 20 minutes. “It was really exciting for astronomers to capture the moment, which they recorded as a sudden flare of optical light from a distant star,” stated Cnn

shock breakout is the initial flash of brightness from the explosion that precedes the big event, as the star gets brighter and bigger over about two weeks. The star modeled in the animation above is known as KSN 2011d, a red giant 500 times larger than our sun.“The closest star system to our own solar system is about 4.2 light years away.” Stated popsci.com

“A supernova occurs at the end of a massive star’s life, as a colossal, catastrophic explosion erupts, causing the star to burn brighter than some galaxies for around two weeks before fading to black.” Cnn reported The team analyzing the Kepler data found exactly what they were looking for: a red supergiant 500 times the size of our sun and around 1.2 billion light years away exploded while in the telescope’s view.

Telegraph.co wrote, “The spectacular expansion of primary colors is in fact the animation of a supernova – showing the shockwaves of a star exploding – seen for the first time by a team of international astronomers.” Scientists watched the earliest moments of two old stars exploding using the Kepler Space Telescope, named after Johannes Kepler, who discovered the last observed supernova in the Milky Way in 1604.