The Solar Cloth Company; Integrating with “One of the UK’s biggest retailers”

Photo+Courtesy+of+thinkprogress.org

Photo Courtesy of thinkprogress.org

Perry Carroll, founder and acting CEO of The Solar Cloth Company was sailing in the Atlantic when he looked up to see his sail glowing in the moonlight ten years ago. “It should be solar,” he thought, in a stroke of brilliance. Ever since, he has been chasing the idea of making a flexible solar pane, according to www.smithsonianmag.com.

 

The Solar Cloth Company conducted extensive research and developed working in close collaboration with the UK’s foremost universities the past seven years. They are now able to commercialize the design and manufacture of lightweight, flexible solar panels and a wide product portfolio, claimed www.thesolarclothcompany.com.

 

While traditional solar panels weigh between 16kg to 20kg per square meter, this cloth is just 2kg per sq m, reported www.telegraph.co.uk.

 

In addition, Carroll said he was on track to pilot its latest building integrated solar cloth with “one of the UK’s biggest retailers” from January, stated www.businessgreen.com.

 

“It was fantastic that they were thinking of using solar, but what they came up with wasn’t quite so fantastic,” said the firm’s founder Perry Carroll, according to www.cambridge-news.co.uk.

 

“One of the main hindrances to solar panel adoption is that they can be difficult to install and integrate with existing architecture functionally and aesthetically,” said Hans Haenlein, adviser to The Solar Cloth Company, according to www.businessspectator.com.au. “Flexible solar cloth overcomes all of these problems and can add real value to existing and upcoming sites.”

 

Carroll said: “They will be testing our product in new carbon neutral branches throughout their estate of 2,500 buildings, We are also very excited to be in discussion with two well-known London museums who have set us the challenge of solarising their buildings in ways that complement their period design,” claimed www.theengineer.co.uk.

 

The firm is currently collaborating with the University of Cambridge and other leading European Universities for projects to create ultra-low cost TFPV; and is seeking an investment of £750,000 is to expand it production facilities and sales teams to deliver its 2015 sales pipeline, reported www.energymatters.com.au.

 

“The applications of thin flexible photovoltaics is tremendous – from commercial installations to clothing and other tensile structures,” said Perry Carroll, according to eandt.theiet.org. “For example, there is over 1.1 billion square metres [meters] of commercial roofing space in the UK, which is a huge amount of space that is perfect for our flexible solar panels.”