Hurricane Dorian’s Damage is Widespread

Chef Jose Andres, "Save the Children," and the Humane Society have stepped in to help people and animals.

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Hurricane Dorian’s Damage is Widespread

Weather Channel

Weather Channel

Weather Channel

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Hurricane Dorian left an estimated damage of $1.5 to $3 billion, stated CNBC. In its wake as it passed through the Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Greenland, the east coast of the U.S., Jan Mayen, Lesser Antilles, and Atlantic Canada, during the period of August 24 to September 9.

Although Hurricane Dorian left a trail of destruction in many places, its greatest damage was in the Bahamas. According to theatlantic.com, “Since hitting Great Abaco (in the Bahamas) as a Category 5 on Sunday afternoon, the storm has stubbornly refused to move.” In addition, at least five people have died in the Bahamas.

Hurricane Dorian began as a tropical storm over the Central Atlantic on August 24, with wind speeds of around 80 mph (129 km/h), but within a week had grown into a category 3 hurricane with wind speeds of around 120 mph (193 km/h), according to Boston.com. On September 1st, Hurricane Dorian reached its max wind speed of 185 mph (295 km/h) According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, “Dorian is the first hurricane to reach category five in 2019.” Dorian was also the first hurricane in 2019 that was named.

Dorian’s effects were widespread. In addition to the Bahamas, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, were also hit hard. “On Thursday, Sept. 5, Dorian spawned more than a dozen tornadoes in North Carolina,” WorldVision reported.

Once Dorian passed, the true damage was revealed. For example, “more than 70,000 people were estimated to have no food or shelter during the hurricane,” reported Aljazeera. 

 According to CBS News, “thousands of buildings had lost power from the hurricane,” Fox News verified, Hurricane Dorian claimed more than 50 lives, and an estimated 2,500 people are still missing.  

After Hurricane Dorian, thousands of people were left without food and water and were in need of urgent help. Some people like world-renowned chef José Andrés helped out by donating food and water. Others like the Humane Society of the United States helped out by rescuing animals that were in the destruction of the Hurricane. Save the Children helped out by assisting in reopening childcare services, according to CBS News.


Predicting hurricanes accurately can be very difficult, explained hurricanescience.org. Today, sophisticated tools, such as satellite images from the Doppler radar are used to make more accurate predictions. They can predict approximate wind speeds and intensity for sustained winds. Scientists can usually predict its path for three to five  days in advance. Even with these satellites and sophisticated tools, hopefully more innovations will follow to prevent loss of life and home. 

Readers interested in helping people and animals affected by Hurricane Dorian can find reputable organizations at this link:

https://www.nbcnews.com/better/lifestyle/how-help-victims-hurricane-dorian-ncna1050851

 

 

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