GOP Holds Control of House and Senate

nytimes.com

nytimes.com

Republicans maintained their majorities in both chambers of the United States Congress in a significant election on Tuesday, November 8, in which Donald Trump became the President of the United States, according to reuters.com.

The night began with majority control of the Senate up for grabs, with 34 of 100 seats available, according to bbc.com.

The Democrats had only gained one seat in the Senate, with Tammy Duckworth, a double amputee Iraq war veteran, taking Republican Mark Kirk’s place in Illinois, according to bbc.com.

In California, Kamala Harris was elected the state’s first new Senator in 24 years, according to latimes.com.

In Nevada, Catherine Cortez Masto retained for the Democrats, beating Republican Joe Heck to become the first Latina US Senator, according to latimes.com.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, who distanced himself from Mr Trump after previously endorsing him, won the re-election to the House of Representatives in Wisconsin, according to bbc.com.

“We are eager to work hand-in-hand with the new administration to advance an agenda to improve the lives of the American people,” Ryan told supporters.

North Carolina’s Senate was held by Republican Richard Burr, and Wisconsin senator Ron Johnson, Republican, held off Russ Feingold even with the widespread expectations of a win for the Democrat, according to bbc.com.

In Arizona, Republican Senator and 2008 presidential nominee John McCain won his sixth term at the age of 80, suggesting it is his last one. In Florida, former Republican Presidential nominee Marco Rubio won the re-election, according to bbc.com.

Roy Blunt of Missouri also withstood a more-difficult-than-expected fight against Jason Kander, Missouri’s secretary of state, according to nytimes.com.

In Pennsylvania, Patrick J. Toomey won after casting himself in a bipartisan light and “touting” his work with Democrats on gun control, according to latimes.com.

Democrats also failed to significantly dent Republican advantage in the House, with just five Republican incumbents losing, according to bbc.com.