Millions of Lives Have Been Saved From Malaria

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Photo credits : wikipedia

The death rates from malaria went down by 60% in the last 15 years, which means that more than 6 million lives were saved with most of them being African children, United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) explained.

We have been, “ Taming an ancient disease that over the centuries have killed untold millions of people,” stated Margaret Chan,General Director of the World Health Organization (WHO).

An increasing amount of countries on the edge of removing malaria, in 2014, 13 countries reported zero cases and six had fewer than 10 cases. Malaria kills people in Africa mainly and they are getting rid of it. The experts  from this report said a crucial Millennium Development Goal has been met “convincingly,” with new cases of the parasitic mosquito-borne infection down by 37 percent since 2000, according to the report, produced between WHO and the United Nations.

The United Nations has a fresh goal they want completed by 2030, to cut the amount of deaths by further than 90%. In order to meet this 15 year goal that was put in place May 2015, annual funding for malaria will have to triple from $2.7 billion to $8.7 in 2030, the United Nations explained.

“Malaria kills mostly children, especially those living in the poorest and most remote places. So the best way to celebrate global progress…. is to recommit ourselves to reaching and treating them,” stated Anthony Lake, UNICEF Executive Director.

A study published in the journal Nature showed that 68% of malaria cases were stopped by a bednet since 2000. 22 and 10% of the cases prevented were due to anti-malarial drugs called Artemisinin-based combination therapies and indoor spraying, according to the Huffington Post.

With this progress malaria, however, still remains a threat in some places of world. Almost half the world, 3.2 billion people, are still at risk of malaria. This year alone, there has been an estimated 214 million new cases and around 438,000 deaths, the Huffington Post states.

By 2030, it would be ideal to cut the amount of deaths by further than 90%. In order to meet this 15 year goal that was put in place May 2015, annual funding for malaria will have to triple from $2.7 billion to $8.7 in 2030, the United Nations explains.