American Bald Eagle Coming Back from Near Extinction

Photo Courtesy of Huffingtonpost.com

Photo Courtesy of Huffingtonpost.com

The American Bald Eagle once thought to be near extinction with a population dwindling around 30,000 is now believed to have a population of 70,000 as a result of major environmental protections according to nationaleaglecenter.org.

“If America did not put the Bald Eagle on the protection list they would be extinct,” stated Dr. Liedbald, Eagle Breeder.  The Bald Eagle is protected by the US government because it is the national symbol of America. As a result of people hunting them for feathers or capturing them for sale the Bald Eagle has become endangered. ationaleaglecenter.org.

The penalties for hunting the Bald Eagle are stiff. People caught hunting Bald Eagles there can at least be a fine of $250,000 and at least two years in prison.

“The Bald Eagle is one of the most majestic bird(s) in the air,” stated  Dr. Liedbald.

During breeding an eagle in the wild stays with the female bald eagle for 6 weeks, where as in an animal shelter they stay for eight weeks.

The Bald Eagle is one of the fiercest mammals in the air. It can fly up to 35 miles per hour and it can reach up to 100 miles an hour when diving for prey. Their prey can be rodents, fish, and smaller birds, they will fly 100 square mile to find food, according to the defenders.org.

The average weight of a Bald Eagle is 10-14 pound, according to the Defenders.org. The female Bald Eagle lay about one to two eagles in their life time. The average Bald Eagle lives about 20 years if it is healthy. The record for the Bald Eagle is 28 years.

When bald eagles work, their nest can weigh up to a two ton. The male and the female bald eagles build their nests together. Their nests can range from four to five feet in diameter, according to nationaleaglecenter.org. It take an eagle one to three months to build their nests.

An eagle can find it prey so well because of its eyes. Which are about the size of a human eye but it is like binoculars. An eagle can see at night if it needs to find food, or its nest, reported to nationaleaglecenter.org.