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Snub-Nosed Monkey Endangered by Human Appetite

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The recently discovered species, the colourSnub-Nosed Monkey, is in danger of becoming extinct. As it is being hunted and eaten by local hunters in Myanmar, according to nationalgeographic.com.

“The only scientifically observed specimen had been killed by local hunters the time researchers found it—and was eaten soon after,” later stated nationalgeographic.com.

The species was discovered in 2010, researchers believe that only 300 Snub-Nosed Monkeys exist in Asia through Southern China. A Snub-Nosed Monkey can live for 18 years without anybody’s help, according to donate.fauna-flaura.org.

“Hunting, illegal logging and proposed hydropower development, taking place within the context of a simmering civil conflict, threaten to push the species to extinction,” according to mongabay.com.They could cost up to $1,500 per snub-nosed monkey, according to Squiver.com.

The Golden Snub-Nosed Monkey has blackish-grey shoulders, upper arms, back, crown, and tail, with the back being covered in a longer layer of fine silver hairs.

“In males, the sides of the head, forehead, and neck and underparts are bright gold color, hence the common name of this species,” according to arkive.org

“Females are generally similar in appearance to males, but the head and upper parts are more brownish black. Their noses are, as the name suggests, flattened and set back from the muzzle. The wide nostrils face forwards and there are two small flaps of skin above the nostrils that nearly touch the forehead.”

“These monkeys produce a wide range of vocalizations often, remarkably, without making any facial movements, in the manner of a ventriloquist,” according to arkive.org.

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4 Comments

4 Responses to “Snub-Nosed Monkey Endangered by Human Appetite”

  1. Hannah Arritt on February 27th, 2017 10:38 am

    I do not think it is right that they are being killed because there are not a lot of them and they are in danger.

    [Reply]

  2. Riley Pietsch on March 2nd, 2017 5:39 pm

    I enjoyed reading your article because I learned that a species of monkeys I’ve never heard of is being killed off by hunters.

    [Reply]

  3. Jayden Gonzalez on March 2nd, 2017 8:00 pm

    I do not think it’s right to kill and eat them, because they will soon be extinct.

    [Reply]

  4. Kylie Morton on March 3rd, 2017 2:21 pm

    I hope we will eventually be able to save them. I also enjoyed reading this, but also sad about this.

    [Reply]

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